Mountain Roasted Green Tea from Shan Valley Tea, Myanmar

Let’s do a review of a product from a tea producing country that is new to my journey, Myanmar. This review will focus on the Mountain Roasted Green Tea from Shan Valley Tea. Shan Valley Tea purchases the green tea leaves from small local farmers in the Shan state of northern Myanmar (Burma). This region consists of mountainous terrains, and has a tea producing history spanning hundreds of years. To visit the Shan Valley website, please click here.

The sample packet has been opened, and a roasty,char aroma is filling the air. Let the journey begin…

Mountain Roasted Green Tea Dry Leaves

Mountain Roasted Green Tea Dry Leaves

The dry leaves have a dark green, almost black color. The leaves appear to be medium sized to large leaf fragments. There are a few bare stems in the mix. The leaves are rolled. The aroma has scents of char, wood, and dry grass.

Three grams of dry leaves were placed in a 5 ounce (150 ml) ceramic infusion cup. Purified spring water was heated to 175°F (75°C). The leaves were infused for two minutes.

Mountain Roasted Green Tea 1st Infusion

Mountain Roasted Green Tea 1st Infusion

The first infusion produced a liquor with a pale light yellow color, clear and transparent. The aroma has scents of char, wood, dried fruit, and light roasted nuts. The body is medium, with a round, almost juice-like texture. The taste has notes of char, fruit (cherry) undertones, wood, and light roasted nut. There was a moderate level of astringency. The aftertaste gradually evolved from wood and char to a floral essence being left on the breath.

Mountain Roasted Green Tea 2nd Infusion

Mountain Roasted Green Tea 2nd Infusion

The second infusion produced a liquor with a similar, but slightly bolder pale-light yellow color. The aroma retained the scents of char, wood, and roasted nuts. The body remained medium, and the texture remained round. The taste maintained the char, wood, and roasted nut notes, while lightening on the cherry undertones. The aftertaste maintained char and wood notes which changed to a floral essence.

My camera malfunctioned on the photo of the third infusion, but I did not realize this until I went to transfer it to my computer. Anyway, the color of the liquor lightened some from the second infusion. The aroma lightened, but retained the char, wood, and nutty scents. The body and taste also lightened. Char, wood, and roasted nut notes continue to dominate the taste. There was plenty of taste in the third infusion, and I had no trouble enjoying the experience.

Mountain Roasted Green Tea Infused Leaves

Mountain Roasted Green Tea Infused Leaves

The infused leaves varied in color, with most leaves having a fresh forest green color, and others being a darker green, almost brown color. The leaves were all medium to large fragments, with some bare stems in the mix. The leaves are not fully unrolled, and I believe they could provide an additional infusion or two of acceptable character. The aroma has scents of char, wood, and nuts.

The Mountain Roasted Green Tea was a great first experience of tea from Myanmar. The taste was earthy, yet refreshing. The cherry undertones were very enjoyable in the first infusion. The roasted aroma was warming and calming. The appearance of the infused leaves was very fresh and lively. I am interested to try the unroasted teas that are waiting for me at home.

Thank you to Shan Valley Tea for providing the samples to me. I am certainly enjoying my experience with Myanmar tea. Cheers!

%d bloggers like this: